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20121204
20121204
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>>> good morning. welcome to "squawk box." i'm becky quick with joe kernen. andrew is off this week. we have two guest hosts with us. welcome to both of you you. we have a lot of things to talk about. the white house says that a republican counteroffer does not meet the test of balance. the latest republican offer would overhaul the tax code and raise $800 billion in new revenue, it would also seek $600 billion in health savings and $200 billion for revising the cost of living increases for social security. the net savings would add up to $2.2 trillion over ten years. now, again, this is the republican counterproposal to the plan that the white house has already put out. speaker john boehner has said that this is something that is much closer to the bowles-simpson proposal. erskine bowles saying the gop offer does not represent the plan, he says both sides are kind of far away from it at this point and that it's now up to negotiators to figure out where the middle ground is today. >> bowles said that the mid point that i used back in -- this is where we were last year. so used the m
giant has said about the fiscal cliff in an exclusive interview telling becky quick that the impact of the fiscal cliff is already being felt in business planning for next year and 2014. >> even leading up to that, people becoming more conservative. that's had an impact on what the growth will be in '13 all things being equal and we're in danger if this strings out into '13 that you could have problems of what '14 would look like. >> by 2013 if negotiations get strung out, it will impact decision making and whether or not to build a plant or hire people or expand a division or not. >> which we have heard time and again from many of the leaders and many corporations whether they be financial or otherwise. it comes back to this world. certainty. lack of it. and we don't have a lot of certainty at this point. they still have to do business. not as though they won't come in on january 1st and go to work. they are. >> i was thinking, david, could there possibly be any m&a between now and year end? no. >> maybe a little. >> there will be some. you're less likely to make the big move. less
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rundown. joining me now becky quick. so you guys are calm, right? remain calm, all is well. >> reporter: yeah, all is well. things are going well. actually it's good news that you have two different plans on the table. that means you can make progress even if it seems like those two plans are worlds apart. hey, they have a blueprint for how they can get to a compromise, get to middle ground. one thing we've been watching, how firms are acting differently ahead of the fiscal cliff. you have a lot of companies, over 110 now, that have talked about how they're going to be doing special dividends or increased dividends in the fourth quarter just in the last few weeks or a year because they want to make sure they bring the dividends from next year into this year. if we do go over the fiscal cliff, dividends will be taxed at more than 44% versus the 15% they're taxed at now. so companies are trying to find a way for shareholders to get in a little bit early no matter what happens with the fiscal cliff. >> all right. you know what, you can take the two plans, are split them down the middle. yo
exclusively with our becky quick on the impact of the fiscal cliff, repercussion does go well into 2014 inside now from one of the best known negotiation experts around, harvard business school professor deepak ma hallow and author of "i moved your cheese" and genius, pleasure to have you here. >> pleasure to be here. >> i you noticed from the notes, you said we begin a negotiation and taking this out of the political context and talk about large-scale negotiations, per say you have to think two steps ahead. why? wh what does that give you? >> if you don't play out the negotiations and see what's going to happen week or month later in the event there is no deal, you're not going to pick the right strategy up front r the current negotiations, for example, both sides thinking about what changes after december 3 11st. if you can look ahead and see things are worse for you in january than now, may want to try earlier to get a deal before it is too late. >> one thing we have noticed a lot of this seems to be playing out in the president coming to the mic, the speaker coming to the mic is that postu
Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5